Low-Cost Management of Diabetic Foot

Last updated: 10-13-2020

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Low-Cost Management of Diabetic Foot

Low-Cost Management of Diabetic Foot
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Abstract
Diabetes rates are rising in Africa, so there is a related rise in complications of the diabetic foot. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is the main factor in developing diabetic foot ulcers in the developing world, but at the same time with the development in the developing world people are changing lifestyle and an increase in urbanization leads to diabetic peripheral arterial disease in people with diabetes. Government funding in many developing countries is very limited, and health services are heavily burdened by diabetes and its complications. The outcome of diabetic foot is very poor and can be tackled without heavy financial spending. Education is the only tool we have in Africa and it should be cost-effective targeted at both health care workers and patients. Training programmes should be designed on diabetic foot care for health care workers with a particular interest in foot care and focussing to cascade the knowledge of foot care prevention and treatment to other health colleagues and patients. One of the unique educational programmes step by step foot care programme, which was piloted in Tanzania and India.
In conclusion in developing countries, educational programmes on prevention and management of diabetic foot are the way forward in the developing world. Multidisciplinary team approach is needed for the management of diabetic foot. Patients with diabetic foot presenting at a less serious and early stage will certainly lead to lower morbidity and death rates.
Keywords
Africa Diabetes Cost Diabetic Foot Management Prevention Education Developing world Peripheral Neuropathy Peripheral Arteria Disease 
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Notes
Acknowledgments
We would like to acknowledge for the helpful discussion with all our colleagues during the genesis of this manuscript is appreciated. We are grateful to Shabneez Gangji and other staff in Dar es Salaam for their assistance.
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